Fat and Sassy

my views on being larger than life.

the dangers of high fructose corn syrup March 27, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 2:51 pm
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As an anthropologist I have know how corn can LOWER the life expectancy of an individual while increasing populations.  When the maya switched to a corn-based diet, their teeth quality and average skeleton age went down.  (but it was easy to grow and store so it allowed for cities….but I digress)  ..I have long been suspicious of high fructose corn syrup and how it inches its way into everything we eat.   I see it in cereal, pop, yogurt, pizzas, lean cuisine for fucks sake.  It’s in sauces, in katschup…its shows up at restaurants (Chilies ribs for one) and just about every single prepared food under the sun.    well, a new study at Princeton university has found what may be the trigger for the obesity epidemic. 

A Princeton University research team has shown that not all sweeteners are created equal.   Rats with access to HFCS gained MUCH more weight than those with access to cane sugar, even if the total caloric intake was exactly the same.  In addition to causing significant weight gain in lab animals, long-term use of HFCS also led to abnormal increases in body fat, especially in the belly (and we all know the dangers  of OMG BELLY FAT) and a rise in circulating blood fats called triglycerides.  

Humm….maybe it IS big agribusiness selling us chemicals in everything that we eat making us fat……. sort of like I thought all along (thank GOD my dad had a degree in  chemistry and hated it as well…thank GOD growing up we thought Katie had corn allergies… wait a second…maybe the fact my little sister NEVER got HFCS until well into her teens as we thought she had a corn allergy.   We never had anything prepared…dad made almost everything from scratch.    Maybe I ended up fat because I DID eat HFCS until about 7 when we found her corn allergy.   but i digress…..

“Some people have claimed that high-fructose corn syrup is no different than other sweeteners when it comes to weight gain and obesity, but our results make it clear that this just isn’t true, at least under the conditions of our tests,” said psychology professor Bart Hoebel, who specializes in the neuroscience of appetite, weight and sugar addiction. “When rats are drinking high-fructose corn syrup at levels well below those in soda pop, they’re becoming obese — every single one, across the board. Even when rats are fed a high-fat diet, you don’t see this; they don’t all gain extra weight.”

The results were published online in the journal Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior, the researchers from the Department of Psychology and the Princeton Neuroscience Institute reported on two experiments investigating the link between the consumption of high-fructose corn syrup and obesity.  the results were released on march 18th.

The first study gave rats HFCS water in one group, and cane or table sugar-water in another group, in addition to regular rat chow.  The concentration of sugar in the sucrose solution was the same as is found in some commercial soft drinks, while the high-fructose corn syrup solution was half as concentrated as most sodas.

The second experiment — the first long-term study of the effects of high-fructose corn syrup consumption on obesity in lab animals — monitored weight gain, body fat and triglyceride levels in rats with access to high-fructose corn syrup over a period of six months. Compared to animals eating only rat chow, rats on a diet rich in high-fructose corn syrup showed characteristic signs of a dangerous condition known in humans as the metabolic syndrome, including abnormal weight gain, significant increases in circulating triglycerides and augmented fat deposition, especially visceral fat around the belly. Male rats in particular ballooned in size: Animals with access to high-fructose corn syrup gained 48 percent more weight than those eating a normal diet.

These rats aren’t just getting fat; they’re demonstrating characteristics of obesity, including substantial increases in abdominal fat and circulating triglycerides,” said Princeton graduate student Miriam Bocarsly. “In humans, these same characteristics are known risk factors for high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, cancer and diabetes.” In addition to Hoebel and Bocarsly, the research team included Princeton undergraduate Elyse Powell and visiting research associate Nicole Avena, who was affiliated with Rockefeller University during the study and is now on the faculty at the University of Florida. The Princeton researchers note that they do not know yet why high-fructose corn syrup fed to rats in their study generated more triglycerides, and more body fat that resulted in obesity.

High-fructose corn syrup and sucrose are both compounds that contain the simple sugars fructose and glucose, but there at least two clear differences between them. First, sucrose is composed of equal amounts of the two simple sugars — it is 50 percent fructose and 50 percent glucose — but the typical high-fructose corn syrup used in this study features a slightly imbalanced ratio, containing 55 percent fructose and 42 percent glucose. Larger sugar molecules called higher saccharides make up the remaining 3 percent of the sweetener. Second, as a result of the manufacturing process for high-fructose corn syrup, the fructose molecules in the sweetener are free and unbound, ready for absorption and utilization. In contrast, every fructose molecule in sucrose that comes from cane sugar or beet sugar is bound to a corresponding glucose molecule and must go through an extra metabolic step before it can be utilized.

In the 40 years since the introduction of high-fructose corn syrup as a cost-effective sweetener in the American diet, rates of obesity in the U.S. have skyrocketed, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In 1970, around 15 percent of the U.S. population met the definition for obesity; today, roughly one-third of the American adults are considered obese, the CDC reported. High-fructose corn syrup is found in a wide range of foods and beverages, including fruit juice, soda, cereal, bread, yogurt, ketchup and mayonnaise. On average, Americans consume 60 pounds of the sweetener per person every year.

“Our findings lend support to the theory that the excessive consumption of high-fructose corn syrup found in many beverages may be an important factor in the obesity epidemic,” Avena said.

Some interesting food for thought…and it DEFINATELY will make me shop more on the OUTSIDE of the store as opposed to the inside.

 from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100322121115.htm

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Quick hit : fat and work stress March 26, 2010

Filed under: FH,FN,FS — erylin @ 2:00 pm
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from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100324142133.htm

A new study that provides a snapshot of a typical American workplace observed that chronic job stress and lack of physical activity are strongly associated with being overweight or obese.

Unexpectedly, researchers also found that a diet rich in fruits and vegetables did little to offset the effect of chronic job stress on weight gain among the employees, who were mostly sedentary. Instead, exercise seemed to be the key to managing stress and keeping a healthy weight.

University of Rochester Medical Center researchers conducted the study of 2,782 employees at a large manufacturing facility in upstate New York, but the results could be applicable to almost any job situation in which layoffs, or lack of control at work, is a major concern.

The Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine published the research in January 2010.

  the study found that over and over, Fernandez’s team heard the same story from the upstate workers: After spending the day sitting in stressful meetings or at their computers, they looked forward to going home and “vegging out” in front of the TV. Anecdotally, researchers also discovered that when pink slips were circulating, the snacks highest in fats and calories would disappear quickest from the vending machines. Some workers said they did not take the time to eat well or exercise at lunch because they were fearful of repercussions from leaving their desks for too long.

 

Quick hits round up 3 March 15, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 7:08 pm
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Time for a quick hit round-up.  As usual trigger warnings on all of this and beware the links…many are not exactly fat friendly, but much of it is interesting stuff.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100309111641.htm low-income women in small towns more likely to be obese.

Dzewaltowski said the findings indicate that the choice of supermarkets may be a more relevant issue than the availability of supermarkets. The findings also suggest that most of the low-income women reside within the urban cluster of the micropolitan areas and are likely to be exposed to multiple fast food restaurants and other high-caloric density eating opportunities, which are often absent in rural areas.

The researchers said policies that increase the accessibility of healthful foods at small grocery stores might be a promising strategy for reducing the higher prevalence of obesity in rural areas.

Stomach’s Sweet Tooth  Turns out taste is not just for the tongue (from http://www.sciencenews.org/view/feature/id/57132/title/Stomach%E2%80%99s_Sweet_Tooth)
              Turns out there are taste buds in the gut and it seems that these gut taste buds have some link to insulin and its use in the body.   There are taste cells in the stomach, intestine and, evidence suggests, the pancreas, colon and esophagus. These sensory cells are part of an ancient battalion tasked with guiding food choices since long before nutrition labels, Rachael Ray or even agriculture existed. While taste cells in the mouth make snap judgments about what should be let inside, new work suggests that gut taste cells serve as specialized ground forces, charged with preparing the digestive system for the aftermath of the tongue’s decisions. 
              Newly discovered taste cells in the gut appear to send a “prepare for fuel” message to the body, a finding that may explain a link between diet soda and diabetes risk.  Not so sure what this means for obesity, weight loss  or metabolism as of yet, the research is just beginning.  I will be keeping a close eye on this research.  stay tuned.  My Guess – some new pill to melt away the pounds using the new proven science of GUT taste buds.   Bitter will become the new Atkins diet since it sends DO NOT ABSORB signals when tasted by the gut.  bah.
 

oh how i have been betrayed March 13, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 4:03 pm
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If you didn’t know already I love food porn shows.  Anthony Bordain is my favorite…i love his almost beat-poetry narrative, his rock and roll sensibility, his willingness to try any food, be it high-end or drunken street vendors, his leather jacket and hair that reminds me of my father. And, until today, his show is free of fatty fatty 2 x 4 narritive…he partakes in whole pigs and bitter beer with wild abandon, greasy fingers and all.  

Until today.   One of his guests on his current show is about food bloggers…and one of the bloggers was scared into giving up is heart, his soul, his livelyhood….they forced him onto a diet because of a heart attack and cholesterol problem.   So while Anthony Bordain….fucking rock and roll king who MADE it….has his own food network show and everything is there, giving an interview to you about your favorite burger….and he has to eat a fucking greek salad and apologize and give the good-fatty-imma-loose-weight docta! ™  spiel.   DAMMIT.    this is food netowork…im supposued to be (relatively) free of this fat hate (especially with tivo to filter out diet commercials), this constant bombardment.   If I wanted to watch diet food I wouldnt tune into to Bordain….he’s sheer food porn…But i guess I don’t get to enjoy my food porn without a fatty disclaimer anymore.

After the commercial break he goes onto say HIS doctor has made him go on a diet too.   HIM.   Bordain is not what i would call obese.   I guess, in a way Bordain proves what HAES proponents have been saying all along.   You CAN be skinny and unhealthy.   Bordain is by no means obese….hes motorcycle/rocker cool, whipcord and lean….but he proves that eating fried pork skin and sausages with beer and smokes for a living is hard on the old ticker, the plumbing system in the body. 

Interestingly all the direct to the audience narrative that usually goes on is his shows is there….as he butchers a whole pig on camera….A little heavy-handed with the symbolism, no?

I feel betrayed.   One more not so safe place.  I know I shouldnt, I feel the saving grace of Bordain admitting even he with his unhealthy love of all things pork is UNhealthy though skinny.  But the food porn has been marred with OMG EAT BETTER YOU ARE GONNA DIEEEEEEEE.    I guess it’s better the fatty fatty 2×4 gonna drop dead on the kitchen floor media hype of the OMGZ OBESITY EPIDEMPIC.

 

Starve the fat babies part 2 March 11, 2010

Filed under: childhood obesity — erylin @ 10:41 am
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More craziness in the world of childhood obesity.    A study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that obese children as young as 3 years old have elevated levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation that in adults is considered an early warning sign for possible future heart disease.  Great….lets get junior on statin meds.    The study also found elevated levels of the ratio of ferritin/transferrin saturation (F/T) and the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) — in obese children. Elevated F/T levels started at age 6 and elevated ANC levels were found starting at age 9.

the study was huge too….the study was published online March 1 by the journal Pediatrics. Skinner and fellow Department of Pediatrics researchers Eliana Perrin, M.D., M.P.H., Michael Steiner, M.D. and Frederick Henderson, M.D. arrived at these findings after analyzing data collected as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2006.

Their analysis included data from 16,335 children ages 1-17 years, who were grouped into four categories based on their body mass index (BMI): healthy weight, overweight, obese and very obese. Under this scheme, a 3.5-year-old who is 39 inches tall and weighs 34 pounds would be in the healthy weight category while a child of the same age and height weighing 43 pounds would be considered very obese. In the group of children analyzed, nearly 70 percent were healthy weight, 15 percent were overweight, 11 percent were obese and 3.5 percent were very obese.

More and more, i think the data is showing the genetic heritability of obeisty….it is all well and good to blame fat people for their weight and health….but 3 year olds?   6 year olds?  Are their parents REALLY feeding them buckets of lard, or so weak willed they let them eat boxes of cookies?  come on get real.  The article goes on to talk about early intervention…..what are we gonna do make 3 year olds run on a treadmill and not eat meat?   /headdesk

 

Futhur harmful side effects. March 10, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 11:24 pm
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from http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100310175143.htm

 I ran across this lovely jewel today….apparently they have proved that people who are obese and undergo WLS, the are more likely to get kidney stones than their non WLS counterparts.   Even people with no previous stones or a family history of stones show a marked concentration of the ingredients for the stones.  The researchers found that the excretion of a material called oxalate in urine was significantly greater in the participants who had the surgical procedure than those who did not (47 percent, compared with 10.5 percent, respectively). In addition, the amount of a chemical called citrate in the urine was low in many gastric bypass patients in comparison to the obese nonsurgical group (32 percent to 5 percent). Oxalate is found in the majority of kidney stones, while citrate inhibits stone formation.

“Almost half of the patients who had undergone gastric bypass and did not have a history of kidney stones showed high urine oxalate and low urine citrate — factors that lead to kidney-stone formation,” said Dr. Naim Maalouf, assistant professor of internal medicine in the Charles and Jane Pak Center for Mineral Metabolism and Clinical Research and the study’s lead author.

 

some interesting links March 5, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 2:47 pm
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kids eat better when they grow their own

school kids eat better when they help grow it.  sounds logical, but they did a study to figure tha one out.  They looked at 1,600 kids in MO….. They found that preschool children who were almost always served homegrown fruits and vegetables were more than twice as likely to eat five servings a day than those who rarely or never ate homegrown produce.  In addition, children who grow up eating fresh-from-the-garden produce also prefer the taste of fruits and vegetables to other foods, the parents told researchers.   a great quote from the article:

“When children are involved with growing and cooking food, it improves their diet,” Haire-Joshu said. “Students at schools with gardens learn about math and science and they also eat more fruits and vegetables. Kids eat healthier and they know more about eating healthy. It’s a winning and low-cost strategy to improve the nutrition of our children at a time when the pediatric obesity is an epidemic problem.”

http://obesitynews.com.au/?p=368

Depression and obesity linked

So there was a big meta study done involving depression and obesity.  Floriana S. Luppino, M.D., of Leiden University Medical Center and GGZ Rivierduinen, Leiden, the Netherlands, and colleagues analyzed the results of 15 previously published studies involving 58,745 participants that examined the relationship over time between depression and overweight or obesity.  The results are a bit surprising.  Obese people had a 55 percent increased risk of developing depression over time, while depressed people had a 58 percent increased risk of becoming obese, even AFTER adjusting for medication side effects.    Pretty interesting stuff.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100301165728.htm

exersize keeps you healthy even through weight gain

YAY!  another study proving HAES.   ill leave it to their own words:

With the obesity rate rising for American adults and children, health concerns such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease are a frequent reality. Although obesity itself is a major risk factor for disease, most of the threat may be associated with a cluster of risk factors called the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Losing weight can improve health and reduce these risk factors, but many people have difficulty keeping the weight off. 

In the study, individuals who didn’t exercise during weight regain experienced significant deterioration in metabolic health, while those who exercised maintained improvements in almost all areas. The MU study, led by Tom R. Thomas, professor in the Department of Nutrition and Exercise Physiology in the College of Human Environmental Sciences, is the first to examine the role of exercise in countering the negative effects of weight regain on MetS and overall health status.

“Although many people are successful at losing weight through diet and exercise, the majority of them will relapse and regain the weight,” Thomas said. “The findings of this study indicate that regaining weight is very detrimental; however, exercise can counter those negative effects. The findings support the recommendation to continue exercising after weight loss, even if weight is regained.”

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100302131717.htm