Fat and Sassy

my views on being larger than life.

Obesity as metabolic protection March 11, 2010

Filed under: Uncategorized — erylin @ 3:30 pm
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 from science daily

The collection of symptoms that is the metabolic syndrome — insulin resistance, high cholesterol, fatty liver, and a greater risk for diabetes, heart disease, and stroke — are all related to obesity, but, according to a review in the March 9th issue of Trends in Endocrinology and Metabolism, not in the way you probably think they are.

In fact, says Roger Unger of the University of Texas Southwestern at Dallas, obesity is the body’s way of storing lipids where they belong, in fat tissue, in an effort to protect our other organs from lipids’ toxic effects. It’s when the surplus of calories coming in gets to be too much for our fat tissue to handle that those lipids wind up in other places they shouldn’t be, and the cascade of symptoms known as metabolic syndrome sets in.

Unger cites plenty of evidence in support of a protective role for obesity. Genetic manipulations in mice that increase or decrease fat formation have provided evidence that adipogenesis, meaning the generation of fat cells, delays other metabolic consequences of overeating. The reverse is also true, he writes. Obesity-resistant mice have in some cases been found to develop severe diabetes upon eating too much, as a result of lipid accumulation in tissues other than fat.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100308122023.htm

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Starve the fat babies part 2

Filed under: childhood obesity — erylin @ 10:41 am
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More craziness in the world of childhood obesity.    A study by University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill researchers found that obese children as young as 3 years old have elevated levels of C-reactive protein, a marker of inflammation that in adults is considered an early warning sign for possible future heart disease.  Great….lets get junior on statin meds.    The study also found elevated levels of the ratio of ferritin/transferrin saturation (F/T) and the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) — in obese children. Elevated F/T levels started at age 6 and elevated ANC levels were found starting at age 9.

the study was huge too….the study was published online March 1 by the journal Pediatrics. Skinner and fellow Department of Pediatrics researchers Eliana Perrin, M.D., M.P.H., Michael Steiner, M.D. and Frederick Henderson, M.D. arrived at these findings after analyzing data collected as part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 1999 to 2006.

Their analysis included data from 16,335 children ages 1-17 years, who were grouped into four categories based on their body mass index (BMI): healthy weight, overweight, obese and very obese. Under this scheme, a 3.5-year-old who is 39 inches tall and weighs 34 pounds would be in the healthy weight category while a child of the same age and height weighing 43 pounds would be considered very obese. In the group of children analyzed, nearly 70 percent were healthy weight, 15 percent were overweight, 11 percent were obese and 3.5 percent were very obese.

More and more, i think the data is showing the genetic heritability of obeisty….it is all well and good to blame fat people for their weight and health….but 3 year olds?   6 year olds?  Are their parents REALLY feeding them buckets of lard, or so weak willed they let them eat boxes of cookies?  come on get real.  The article goes on to talk about early intervention…..what are we gonna do make 3 year olds run on a treadmill and not eat meat?   /headdesk