Fat and Sassy

my views on being larger than life.

Fat bottomed girls are A-OK: new study finds pear shape protects against heart disease. January 24, 2010


In my skimmings this week I found this article http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/01/100116104535.htm and forgot about it till today when I found it in my to do folder.  

The tone of the article annoyed me, what  with the “worrying if your bum looks big in this”  but its research appeared to be sound, and the finding really nothing surprising…We have known for years that the “bellyfat”  aka apple shape seen more on the male body shape is worse for you than the “womanly” fat of hips and butt (aka pear shaped).  This study, done by a team from the Oxford Centre for Diabetes, Endocrinology, and Metabolism (OCDEM)  published their summary of the latest research in the International Journal of Obesity.  In fact their findings was not only is it better for you to be pear shaped than apple shaped, but it is ACTUALLY GOOD FOR YOU.   “However, it is only very recently that thigh fat and a larger hip circumference have been shown to promote health, that lower body fat is protective by itself.” says Dr Konstantinos Manolopoulos, one of the paper’s authors along with Dr Fredrik Karpe and Professor Keith Frayn.  wait you mean that lower bottom fat is GOOD for me?     he goes on to add that this protection is INDEPENDENT of weight.  

….and then he {of course) mentions that ‘Control of body weight is still the best way to stay healthy, and the advice remains the same: it is important to eat less and exercise more.’   wait wait…didnt you just tell me that a fat ass was ok…in fact good for me?

Basically, for you tecchies out there, both areas, waist and butt/thigh can store fat…..its easier to lose it off the waist, but that is not really a good thing..fat around the waist is much more active in storing and releasing fatty acids in response to need throughout the day. Thigh fat is used for much longer term storage.  (side note….isnt belly fat eaiser to lose too?)  but thigh fat and butt fat trap the fatty acids longer term, meaning less fatty acids in the blood to build up around organs and muscles, which is what leads to diabetes.   (so fatty acids realised by losing the fat in our bellies causes harm….hummm)  waist fat also releases cytokines which leads to inflammation and things like heart disease……(and the cytokines caused by losing belly fat causes inflamation…which leads to heart attacks and strokes.,……double hummmmm)    What they don’t come out and tell you, but you can see by reading between the lines (or my parentheses)  is….yoyo dieting, caused by loss and gain of belly fat causes heart attacks, diabetes, ect…….

it amazes me that studies can look at these issues and not see the correlations….they are soo busy looking at OMG GET SKINNY that they don’t look at their own data in an unbiased way.

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Diets dont work..DUH! quick link


A new metastudy by UCLA (is THAT a big enough name for you to pay attention to media?  or are you  going to ignore it as usual?)  For one i dont have to be snarky and i will use their own words, but the highlighted emphasis is mine.

Here’s a story that can hardly be called news, but it bears repeating.  Diets do not work.  This latest revelation’s according to a report in the April issue of the journal American Psychologist.  Researchers at UCLA did a meta analysis, a study of 31 other long-term studies. Here’s a story that can hardly be called news, but it bears repeating.  Diets do not work.  This latest revelation’s according to a report in the April issue of the journal American Psychologist.  Researchers at UCLA did a meta analysis, a study of 31 other long-term studies.  They think this research included every study that followed people on diets for two to five years.   And they found that the majority of people regain all weight lost and then some.  And that they would have been better off in the long run simply maintaining their heavier weight rather than stress the body by losing it and gaining it back. 

http://www.scientificamerican.com/podcast/episode.cfm?id=BE73BA72-E7F2-99DF-325F60B2E1AB3C7F